Mahabharat Chapter 15 How Pandavas were Saved

Chapter 15 How Pandavas were Saved

The Pandavas left the elders with reverence and hugged their friends before travelling to Varanavata. They were partially escorted by the locals, who then reluctantly made their way back to the city.

Vidura sternly admonished Yudhishthira in language that only the prince could understand: “H “Whoever thwarts an intelligent enemy’s plans will be the only one to avoid peril. Steel-made weapons aren’t the only ones that can cut. And the intelligent man must be aware of how to protect himself against them if he is to avoid disaster. A rat hiding in a hole or a porcupine digging in the ground are unaffected by the fire that destroys a forest. By observing the stars, the intelligent man may find his whereabouts.”
Despite having begun their journey in the brightness of delight, they were now travelling in a foreboding fog of sadness and anxiety.

When the Varanavata residents learned that the Pandavas were visiting their city, they were overjoyed and greeted them. They moved into the palace under Purochana’s direction after a brief stay in various homes while it was being prepared for them.
In a horrifying twist of irony, the deathtrap was given the name “Sivam,” which means wealth. In light of Vidura’s warning, Yudhishthira painstakingly looked over the entire area and confirmed that it was without a doubt built using flammable materials.

To Bhima, Yudhishthira said: “Even though we are fully aware that the palace is a death trap, we shouldn’t give Purochana the impression that we are aware of his scheme. When the time is perfect, we should flee, but doing so would be challenging if we raised any red flags “As a result, they continued to live carefree in that house. Vidura had dispatched a skilled miner in the meanwhile, who met with them in private and said: “The covert warning Vidura gave you is my password. I’ve come to aid you out of concern for your safety.”

This was intended to reveal Duryodhana’s evil scheme and the best way to avoid danger to Yudhishthira and him alone. Yudhishthira retorted that he understood Vidura’s point of view and afterwards shared it with Kuntidevi.

The miner continued to work for several days in secrecy without Purochana’s knowledge, and he eventually finished an underground exit from the wax house that went beneath and across the walls and the moat that encircled the precincts.

Purochana’s apartments were located near the palace’s entrance. The Pandavas stood guard with weapons at night, but during the day they would go hunting in the forest, seeming to be enjoying themselves but actually learning the trails. They carefully kept their awareness of the evil scheme against their life a secret, as has previously been mentioned. On his end, Purochana took a full year to carry out the plan because he wanted to allay any suspicions and make the horrific fire appear accidental.

Purochana finally decided that he had endured enough waiting. When the fateful moment came, the vigilant Yudhishthira gathered his brothers and warned them that it was now or never for them to go.

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On that particular day, Kuntidevi planned a lavish feast for the guests. She intended to lull them to sound slumber at night after a good meal.

Bhima started multiple fires across the castle around midnight. The Pandava brothers and Kuntidevi raced out via the underground tube, stumbling in the pitch-blackness. The palace was currently ablaze, and a rapidly growing mob of terrified bystanders was wailing loudly and helplessly all around it.

All joined in the cries while some bustled aimlessly in vain attempts to put out the fire: “What a shame! It is undeniably Duryodhana’s doing, and he is murdering the upright Pandavas!”

The palace was burned to the ground. Before he could flee, Purochana’s house caught fire, and he was an unlucky victim of his own nefarious scheme.

The telegram from Varanavata to Hastinapura read: “The palace that was the Pandavas’ residence has burned down and no one in it escaped alive.”

“Just as the water of a deep pool is chilly at the bottom and warm on the surface, so the heart of Dhritarashtra was at once heated with delight and chilled with sadness,” writes Vyasa in a magnificent description of Dhritarashtra’s mental state at the time.

In a show of sadness for the Pandavas who they believed were killed in the fire, Dhritarashtra and his sons removed their regal robes. They went to the river and carried out the propitiatory funeral rites while clothed simply to resemble grieving family.

No visible signs of a heartbroken grief were skipped. Some people saw that Vidura was not as overtaken with grief as the others and attributed this to his philosophical outlook. The truth, however, was that he was aware that the Pandavas had managed to flee and find refuge.

He was actually picturing the tired Pandavas’ wanderings when he appeared dejected. When Vidura noticed that Bhishma was very depressed, he quietly consoled him by telling him how they had managed to flee.

Bhima noticed that his mother and brothers were worn out from keeping watch every night as well as from worry and terror. As a result, he supported Yudhishthira and Arjuna with his two hands while carrying his mother on his shoulders and Nakula, Sahadeva, and Nakula on his hips.

With such a heavy load, he moved with the ease of a Bhagwanly elephant ploughing through the underbrush and over the trees and shrubs in his way.

When they arrived at the Ganges, a boat with a boatman in command who was aware of their identity was waiting for them. They entered a large forest at night, travelling through darkness that engulfed them like a shroud and quiet that was horribly disturbed by the horrible sounds of wild creatures.

Finally, completely worn out from labour, they sat down, unable to withstand the sting of thirst and overtaken by the lethargy of pure exhaustion. Even if the sons of Dhritarashtra are present to take me away, Kuntidevi said, “I must stretch my legs.” She immediately went to bed and fell asleep.

Bhima pushed into the dense jungle in the dead of night in quest of water. He then went in search of a pool, soaked his top garment, constructed cups out of lotus leaves, and took water to his mother and brothers who were dying of thirst.

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Then, while the others slept off, mercifully forgetting their problems, Bhima remained up and sat lost in meditation. He pondered, “Why should the evil Dhritarashtra and Duryodhana want to harm us in these ways since the plants and creepers of the forest do not aid each other and live in peace?” Bhima, who was sinless himself, was overcome with anguish and unable to comprehend the causes of others’ immorality.

The Pandavas continued their march despite facing several challenges and peril. To go more quickly, they would carry their mother for a portion of the distance. They would occasionally halt and rest if they were too exhausted to muster even superhuman endurance. They would occasionally sprint against one another, bursting with vitality and the magnificent vigour of youth.

On the way, they ran across Bhagavan Vyasa. They all bowed before him and listened to his excellent advice and words of encouragement.

When Kunti informed him of their woes, Vyasa comforted her by saying these things: “No man is strong enough to always act in virtue, and no sinner is wicked enough to live their entire lives immersed in evil. Everyone has engaged in both good and bad deeds, and life is a complicated web. Every single person is responsible for the effects of their actions. Refrain from giving in to grief.”

Then, following Vyasa’s advice, they dressed as brahmanas, travelled to the city of Ekachakra, and slept there in a brahmana’s home while they awaited better times.

Keep Mahabharat Book at Home and Read Daily – DO NOT FALL TO FAKE PROPAGANDA and Allow Enemies to Weaken our Dharma and Bharat

This historical epic Mahabharat is known as fifth Veda. It is a common misconception spread by mlecchas; muslims and christian missionaries, and secular Hindus that reading Mahabharat or keeping it at home will likely lead to arguments and fighting. All of this misinformation was spread by illiterate mlecchas and anti-Hindus, and it is completely incorrect. It is done to mentally weaken Hindus so that they avoid reading Mahabharat. Because Mahabharat invokes bravery, pride and sense of confidence in Hindus.

Keep a copy of Mahabharat at home and read it online at the HariBhakt website. Mahabharat is rightly called the fifth Veda for Kaliyuga people because it is a tool and guidance to invoke confidence and bravery in Sanatan Dharmi Hindus.

You can read complete Mahabharat by following Chapter links given below. You can check Glossary of Mahabharat here.

Mahabharat All Chapters (Sampurna Mahabharata)

Mahabharat Chapter 1 Mahabharat Chapter 54
Mahabharat Chapter 2 Mahabharat Chapter 55
Mahabharat Chapter 3 Mahabharat Chapter 56
Mahabharat Chapter 4 Mahabharat Chapter 57
Mahabharat Chapter 5 Mahabharat Chapter 58
Mahabharat Chapter 6 Mahabharat Chapter 59
Mahabharat Chapter 7 Mahabharat Chapter 60
Mahabharat Chapter 8 Mahabharat Chapter 61
Mahabharat Chapter 9 Mahabharat Chapter 62
Mahabharat Chapter 10 Mahabharat Chapter 63
Mahabharat Chapter 11 Mahabharat Chapter 64
Mahabharat Chapter 12 Mahabharat Chapter 65
Mahabharat Chapter 13 Mahabharat Chapter 66
Mahabharat Chapter 14 Mahabharat Chapter 67
Mahabharat Chapter 15 Mahabharat Chapter 68
Mahabharat Chapter 16 Mahabharat Chapter 69
Mahabharat Chapter 17 Mahabharat Chapter 70
Mahabharat Chapter 18 Mahabharat Chapter 71
Mahabharat Chapter 19 Mahabharat Chapter 72
Mahabharat Chapter 20 Mahabharat Chapter 73
Mahabharat Chapter 21 Mahabharat Chapter 74
Mahabharat Chapter 22 Mahabharat Chapter 75
Mahabharat Chapter 23 Mahabharat Chapter 76
Mahabharat Chapter 24 Mahabharat Chapter 77
Mahabharat Chapter 25 Mahabharat Chapter 78
Mahabharat Chapter 26 Mahabharat Chapter 79
Mahabharat Chapter 27 Mahabharat Chapter 80
Mahabharat Chapter 28 Mahabharat Chapter 81
Mahabharat Chapter 29 Mahabharat Chapter 82
Mahabharat Chapter 30 Mahabharat Chapter 83
Mahabharat Chapter 31 Mahabharat Chapter 84
Mahabharat Chapter 32 Mahabharat Chapter 85
Mahabharat Chapter 33 Mahabharat Chapter 86
Mahabharat Chapter 34 Mahabharat Chapter 87
Mahabharat Chapter 35 Mahabharat Chapter 88
Mahabharat Chapter 36 Mahabharat Chapter 89
Mahabharat Chapter 37 Mahabharat Chapter 90
Mahabharat Chapter 38 Mahabharat Chapter 91
Mahabharat Chapter 39 Mahabharat Chapter 92
Mahabharat Chapter 40 Mahabharat Chapter 93
Mahabharat Chapter 41 Mahabharat Chapter 94
Mahabharat Chapter 42 Mahabharat Chapter 95
Mahabharat Chapter 43 Mahabharat Chapter 96
Mahabharat Chapter 44 Mahabharat Chapter 97
Mahabharat Chapter 45 Mahabharat Chapter 98
Mahabharat Chapter 46 Mahabharat Chapter 99
Mahabharat Chapter 47 Mahabharat Chapter 100
Mahabharat Chapter 48 Mahabharat Chapter 101
Mahabharat Chapter 49 Mahabharat Chapter 102
Mahabharat Chapter 50 Mahabharat Chapter 103
Mahabharat Chapter 51 Mahabharat Chapter 104
Mahabharat Chapter 52 Mahabharat Chapter 105
Mahabharat Chapter 53 Mahabharat Chapter 106

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